BAUDRILLARD THE ECSTASY OF COMMUNICATION PDF

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The Ecstasy of Communication by Jean Baudrillard

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Baudrillard leaves behind his older and better-known concept of the simulacrum and tackles the new problem of digital technology acquiring organicity. Paperbackpages. Published June 1st by Semiotext e first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Ecstasy of Communicationplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about The Ecstasy of Communication. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Aug 05, Mike rated it really liked it. If you want a lucid, sober assessment of how times have changed since the end of the Gutenberg Galaxy read Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death.

If you want a funhouse mirror version of the same—implosions and hyperreality—read this one. Or read both and let the two hemispheres of your brain fight it out. Or forget them both and read Harry Potter instead—just keep in mind Rowling’s books are for kids, anyone over 25 reading them without any of their own is about as dignified as a middle age If you want a lucid, sober assessment of how times have changed since the end of the Gutenberg Galaxy read Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death.

Or forget them both and read Harry Potter instead—just keep in mind Rowling’s books are for kids, anyone over 25 reading them without any of their own is about as dignified as a middle aged man wearing no pants playing Xbox. May 15, rhenvar rated it liked it. Mar 27, Mon rated it it was amazing Shelves: We no longer partake of the drama of alienation, but are in the ecstacy of communication.

Many people do not like Baudrillard because he is an arrogant asshole, but I kinda like that snarkiness in his writing, it makes it more fun to read. Keeping in mind that this book was in itself an ironic slap in the face to the academic system, it is rather playful in its dismemberment of theoretical fads and structures and its poignant obscenity.

The words bear their own weight, they just do that iconoclastic thing without breaking sweat. It drops off after that as the words and terms feel less established, more hollow, more jargony. But still an excellent brief ccommunication taken to deforest the conventions of understanding in the 80s. Feb 17, Gytis Dovydaitis rated it really liked it Shelves: Nudity as a desperate statement of existence.

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My head is spinning, thus I call to see a doctor. He inspects me from up close. Gets one of his eyebrows really high. There was no vodka in the shop. I paid what bajdrillard asked nonetheless.

I feel b Obscenity. I feel better now. Dec 31, James Payne rated it liked it Shelves: There are stretches of interest here, but most of the text, even when it should be riveting given the argument and the subject, is dull. It is dull because Baudrillard’s prose, or its translation, leaves the text in permanent abstraction, speaking in generalities, and through neologisms, so baudriloard reader inevitably glazes over. The book itself looks amazing, a cyberpunk high-point for semiotext e and the ads in the back of the book alone make it worth finding it a copy.

This should be so much cool There are stretches of interest here, but most of the text, even when it should be riveting given the argument and the subject, is dull. This should be so much cooler than it is, but one can see how a contemporaneous reader would have been enthralled. The argument about the immanency of hypercommunication without content has certainly been borne out via social media.

Jun 30, Erin rated it it was ok Shelves: Rambling atop a tangent encased by metaphors that serve no other purpose than to preach rather than teach.

The man loves his creative writing, I’ll give him that. Sometimes that writing leads to an association of ecetasy with “death” and hoo boy, why did I want to read this again?

He has fun, which gives a secondhand enjoyment. Nothing more although, probably, something less. Jun 21, vi macdonald rated it really liked it Shelves: What if TV but too much.

Kinda mad, kinda brilliant, very fun. Apr 03, Eric rated it really liked it. A massive spaz out of a philosophy text Contradict half of what you’ve written with the barest meandering of explanation? Probably the only quasi oc who has no particular interest in understanding rhe, Baudrillard seems to have had a lot of fun writing The Ecstasy of Communication.

One can imagine him gleefully banging away at the typewriter which makes it hard not to like even if you feel like it’s empty calories as the genre goes. Jan 04, Elias Garcia rated it really liked it Shelves: A succinct summation of Baudrillard’s thinking post s, when he transitioned from his more ‘optimistic’ views to the passive nihilism of paroxysm.

In this book Baudrillard discusses his theory of communication, communocation on psychoanalysis, theory of seduction, the purpose of theory, the relation and status of the ‘system-object’ dynamic, and hints at his future work Fatal Strategies. Oct 17, Jacob rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed tue book.

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Baudrillard’s perspective can be taken as extreme, but his points are eye-opening and gave me a lot to think about in the days after. His ideas about technology and its drastic effect on the way we move in private and public spheres.

A great academic and discussionable read. May 18, Rich Hancuff rated it really liked it. The first three chapters of this very short book are the strongest. As always, Baudrillard throws a few assertions out there meant more to provoke than convince, but some provocations are solid gems.

The Ecstasy of Communication

Jun 10, Josephine Ensign rated it it was ok. Thankfully this was a very baudrilladr book pagesbecause it is very dense in the peculiar way of French philosophers. May 27, MET rated it it was amazing. Yeah – I’m pretty sure he’s right. Jun 17, John rated it really liked it.

The Ecstasy of Communication – Summary | Future Cinema

This is a useful book, but you have to read it kind of superficially. If you try to understand every sentence you will end up driving yourself insane.

Oct 21, Charla rated it really liked it. I love reading Baudrillards perspectives on our world. Jul 22, Sky rated it it was amazing. Jun 26, Tauni Malmgren rated it it was ok Shelves: Makes me feel stupid. May 13, Chris added it. Dipo Dina rated it did not like it May 01, Torchcountry rated it liked it Dec 20, James Carroll rated it it was amazing Sep 29, Regina rated it really liked it Oct 25, Evie May rated it liked it Aug 17, Rummi rated it really liked it Nov 27, Robert Foschia rated it it was ok Apr 19, Fiona MacKellar rated it liked it Feb 17, Craig rated it really liked it Oct 29, There are no discussion topics on this book yet.

Jean Baudrillard was a French sociologist, philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer. His work is frequently associated with postmodernism and post-structuralism. Jean Baudrillard’s phil Jean Baudrillard was a French sociologist, philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer.

Jean Baudrillard’s philosophy centers on the twin concepts of ‘hyperreality’ and ‘simulation’. These terms refer to the virtual or unreal nature of contemporary culture in an age of mass communication and mass consumption. We live in a world dominated by simulated experiences and feelings, Jean Baudrillard believes, and have lost the capacity to comprehend reality as it actually exists.